See also Moment

English[edit | edit source]

Most common English words: cannot « father « nor « #226: moment » however » enough » quite

Etymology[edit | edit source]

From Old French moment, from Latin momentum.

Pronunciation[edit | edit source]

Noun[edit | edit source]

Singular
Moment

Plural
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Moment ({{{1}}})

  1. A brief, unspecified amount of time.
    Wait up a moment, while I lock the front door.
  2. The smallest portion of time; an instant.
  3. Weight or importance.
    • 1597, Wm. Shakespeare, Richard III, 3,7,67:
      In deep designs, in matter of great moment, / No less importing than our general good.
    • 1904, Arthur Conan Doyle, ‘The Adventure of the Second Stain’ (Norton 2005, p.1192)
      The document in question is of such immense importance that its publication might very easily – I might almost say probably – lead to European complications of the utmost moment.
  4. Template:Physics The turning effect of a force applied to a rotational system at a distance from the axis of rotation. Also called moment of force.
  5. Template:Historical A definite period of time, specifically one-tenth of a point, or one-fortieth or one-fiftieth of an hour.
  6. (informal) A petit mal episode; such a spell.
  7. (colloquial) A fit, a short-duration tantrum, a hissy.

Synonyms[edit | edit source]

Derived terms[edit | edit source]

Related terms[edit | edit source]

Wikipedia

References[edit | edit source]

  • 1897 Universal Dictionary of the English Language, v 3 p 3174. ("The smallest portion of time; an instant." is a direct quote from this Dictionary.)

Translations[edit | edit source]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Anagrams[edit | edit source]


Catalan[edit | edit source]

Etymology[edit | edit source]

Latin momentum

Noun[edit | edit source]

Moment m. (plural Moments)

  1. moment (specific instant or time)
    Template:... el català, malgrat tot, viu un moment de glòria efímera durant els darrers anys del segle XVIII i primers del XIX.
    Catalan, in spite of everything, had a moment of glory for the last years of the 18th Century and the first ones of the 19th.

Dutch[edit | edit source]

Etymology[edit | edit source]

Latin momentum

Pronunciation[edit | edit source]

Noun[edit | edit source]

Moment n. (plural Momenten, diminutive Momentje, diminutive plural Momentjes)

  1. moment (very brief period of time)

French[edit | edit source]

Etymology[edit | edit source]

From Latin momentum

Pronunciation[edit | edit source]

Noun[edit | edit source]

Moment m. (plural Moments)

  1. moment (short period of time)
  2. a while
    Ça fait un moment que je l'attends - I've been waiting for him for a while

Derived terms[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]


Romanian[edit | edit source]

Etymology[edit | edit source]

Latin momentum

Pronunciation[edit | edit source]

Noun[edit | edit source]

Moment n. (plural momente)

  1. moment [Clarification of this translation from Romanian is requested]

Declension[edit | edit source]

de:moment et:moment el:moment es:moment fa:moment fr:moment gl:moment ko:moment io:moment id:moment it:moment kn:moment kk:moment ku:moment li:moment hu:moment ml:moment nl:moment ja:moment no:moment pl:moment pt:moment ru:moment simple:moment sl:moment fi:moment sv:moment tl:moment ta:moment te:moment th:moment tr:moment vi:moment zh:moment

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