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EnglishModificar

EtymologyModificar

From Medieval Latin modalis (pertaining to a mode) < Latin modus (mode); see mode. Compare to French, Spanish and Portuguese modal and Italian modale.

PronunciationModificar

Wikipedia

AdjectiveModificar

Modal (comparative more Modal, superlative most Modal)

Positive
Modal

Comparative
more Modal

Superlative
most Modal

  1. of, or relating to a mode or modus
  2. (grammar) of, relating to, or describing the mood of a clause
  3. (music) of, relating to, or composed in the musical modi by which an octave is divided, associated with emotional moods in Ancient - and in medieval ecclesiastical music
  4. (logic) of, or relating to the modality between propositions
  5. Patrono:Statistics relating to the statistical mode.
  6. Patrono:Computer science requiring immediate user interaction (often used as modal dialog or modal window)

SynonymsModificar

Patrono:Checksyns

Derived termsModificar

Related termsModificar

TranslationsModificar

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

NounModificar

Singular
Modal

Plural
Modals

Modal (plural Modals)
  1. (logic) A modal proposition
  2. (linguistics) A modal form, notably a modal auxiliary.

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FrenchModificar

EtymologyModificar

From Medieval Latin modalis, from Latin modus 'mode'.

AdjectiveModificar

Modal m. (f. Modale, m. plural modaux, f. plural Modales)

  1. modal

Derived termsModificar

NounModificar

Modal m. (plural modaux)

  1. a modal verb

SpanishModificar

AdjectiveModificar

Modal m. and f. (plural modales)

  1. modal

Related termsModificar

de:modal fr:modal io:modal it:modal hu:modal pl:modal ru:modal fi:modal ta:modal vi:modal tr:modal zh:modal

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