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See also Mister

EnglishModificar

PronunciationModificar

Etymology 1Modificar

Unaccented variant of master

NounModificar

Singular
Mister

Plural
Misters

Mister (plural Misters)
  1. Title conferred on an adult male.
    You may sit here, mister.
    • 1855, George Musalas Colvocoresses, Four Years in the Government Exploring Expedition, J. M. Fairchild & co., page 358:
      Fine day to see sights, gentlemen. Well, misters, here's the railing round the ground, and there's the paling round the tomb, eight feet deep, six feet long, and three feet wide.
    • 1908, Jack Brand, By Wild Waves Tossed: An Ocean Love Story, The McClure Company, page 90:
      There's only three misters aboard this ship, or, rather, there's only two.
Coordinate termsModificar
TranslationsModificar

Etymology 2Modificar

From Patrono:Xno[[Category:Patrono:Xno derivations|Mister]] mester, meister (et al.), from Latin misterium.

NounModificar

Singular
Mister

Plural
Misters

Mister (plural Misters)
  1. (obsolete) Someone's business or function; an occupation, employment, trade.
  2. (now rare, dialectal) A kind, type of.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, I.ix:
      The Redcrosse knight toward him crossed fast, / To weet, what mister wight was so dismayd [...].
  3. (obsolete) Need (of something).
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book VI:
      for of your helpe I had grete mystir: For I drede me sore to passe this foreste.
  4. (obsolete) Necessity; the necessary time.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book I.15:
      As for hym sayd kynge Carados, I wylle encountre with kynge bors, and ye wil rescowe me whan myster is [...].

VerbModificar

Infinitive
to Mister

Third person singular
Misters

Simple past
Mistered

Past participle
Mistered

Present participle
Mistering

to Mister (third-person singular simple present Misters, present participle Mistering, simple past and past participle Mistered)
  1. (obsolete, impersonal) To be necessary; to matter.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.vii:
      As for my name, it mistreth not to tell; / Call me the Squyre of Dames that me beseemeth well.

Etymology 3Modificar

mist +‎ -er

NounModificar

Singular
Mister

Plural
Misters

Mister (plural Misters)
  1. A device that makes or sprays mist.
    Odessa D. uses a mister Sunday to fight the 106-degree heat at a NASCAR race in Fontana, California.
Derived termsModificar

AnagramsModificar


ItalianModificar

EtymologyModificar

English

NounModificar

mister m. inv.

  1. mister (appellation)
  2. Patrono:Football coach (trainer)

AnagramsModificar


PolishModificar

NounModificar

Patrono:Pl-noun

  1. Winner of a male beauty pageant.

PortugueseModificar

EtymologyModificar

Probably from Latin ministerium.

PronunciationModificar

  • IPA: /mjs'tɛɾ/

AdjectiveModificar

mis.ter m (oxytone)

  1. of the utmost importance: (Law);
  2. necessary.

NounModificar

mis.ter m (oxytone)

  1. office, position: in a profession; Syn.: work, employment, occupation, profession;
  2. need - n.

SwedishModificar

VerbModificar

mister

  1. present tense of mista

es:mister fr:mister kk:mister sw:mister hu:mister ml:mister pl:mister pt:mister simple:mister fi:mister ta:mister te:mister tr:mister vi:mister zh:mister

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