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See also Mass, and måss

English[]

Etymology 1[]

From Old English mæsse, from Late Latin missa, noun use of feminine past participle of classical Latin mittere (release, dismiss).

Pronunciation[]

Noun[]

Singular
Mass

Plural
es

Mass (es)

  1. Template:Religion The Eucharist, now especially in Roman Catholicism.
  2. (religion) Celebration of the Eucharist.
  3. (religion, usually as the Mass) The sacrament of the Eucharist.
  4. A musical setting of parts of the mass.
Translations[]

Verb[]

Infinitive
to Mass

Third person singular
mass

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
es

to Mass (third-person singular simple present mass, present participle es, simple past and past participle -)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To celebrate mass.
Translations[]

Etymology 2[]

From Template:Xno[[Category:Template:Xno derivations|Mass]] [[masse#Template:Xno|masse]], from Latin massa (lump, dough), from Ancient Greek μᾶζα (maza), barley-cake).

Pronunciation[]

Noun[]

Singular
Mass

Plural
es

Mass (es)

  1. A quantity of matter cohering together so as to make one body, or an aggregation of particles or things which collectively make one body or quantity, usually of considerable size; as, a mass of ore, metal, sand, or water.
    • (A date for this quote is being sought): Sir Isaac Newton — If it were not for these principles, the bodies of the earth, planets, comets, sun, and all things in them, would grow cold and freeze, and become inactive masses
    (A date for this quote is being sought): Savile — A deep mass of continual sea is slower stirred to rage
  2. A large quantity; a sum.
    (A date for this quote is being sought): Sir Walter Raleigh| — All the mass of gold that comes into Spain.
    (A date for this quote is being sought): Sir John Davies — He had spent a huge mass of treasure.
  3. Bulk; magnitude; body; size.
    (A date for this quote is being sought): Shakespeare, Hamlet, IV,iv — This army of such mass and charge
  4. The principal part; the main body.
    (A date for this quote is being sought): Benjamin Jowett (Thucydides) — Night closed upon the pursuit, and aided the mass of the fugitives in their escape
  5. (physics) The quantity of matter which a body contains, irrespective of its bulk or volume. It is one of four fundamental properties of matter. It is measured in kilograms in the SI system of measurement.
  6. (pharmacy) A medicinal substance made into a cohesive, homogeneous lump, of consistency suitable for making pills; as, blue mass.
  7. (medicine) A palpable or visible abnormal globular structure; a tumor.
  8. (bodybuilding) Excess body weight, especially in the form of muscle hypertrophy.
    • 1988, Steve Holman, "Christian Conquers Columbus", Ironman 47 (6): 28-34.
      After all, muscle maniacs go "ga ga" over mass no matter how it's presented.
See also[]
  • Customary units: slug, pound, ounce, long ton (1.12 short tons), short ton (commonly used)
  • Metric units: gram (g), kilogram (kg), metric ton
Derived terms[]
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Please see the discussion on Requests for cleanup(+) for more information and remove this template after the problem has been dealt with.
  • blue mass See under blue
  • critical mass
  • mass center (Geometry): the center of gravity of a triangle
  • mass copper, native copper in a large mass
  • Planck mass
  • the masses, the great body of the people, as contrasted with the higher classes; the populace.
Translations[]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[]

Infinitive
to Mass

Third person singular
mass

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
es

to Mass (third-person singular simple present mass, present participle es, simple past and past participle -)

  1. (transitive) To form or collect into a mass; to form into a collective body; to bring together into masses; to assemble.
    (A date for this quote is being sought): Coleridge — But mass them together and they are terrible indeed.
Translations[]

External links[]

Anagrams[]

  • amss,
  • ASMS
  • sams

ar:mass zh-min-nan:mass et:mass el:mass fa:mass fr:mass hy:mass io:mass it:mass kn:mass kk:mass ku:mass lo:mass hu:mass ml:mass nl:mass pl:mass pt:mass ru:mass simple:mass fi:mass ta:mass te:mass th:mass tr:mass vi:mass zh:mass

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