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EnglishModificar

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EtymologyModificar

From Middle French masque from Italian maschera 'mask, disguise' from Medieval Latin masca, mascha, mascus 'mask, nightmare, ghost', of uncertain origin. Replaced Old English grīma "mask".

Medieval Latin masca, mascha, mascus may represent the merger of two or more words: one related to Old French mascurer 'to blacken, cover the face' (cf. Occitan mascarar, Catalan mascarar), a conflation of a Patrono:Gem[[Category:Patrono:Gem derivations|Mask]] source (from assumed Patrono:Frk[[Category:Patrono:Frk derivations|Mask]] *maska, maskra) represented by Old English mæscre 'mesh; discoloration, spot', Old English masc 'net, mesh netting', Old High German māsca 'mesh, ties', all from Proto-Germanic *maskō-, maskr- (mesh) from Proto-Indo-European *mezg- (to knit, twist), from the practice of wearing mesh netting over the face as a mask to filter air, keeping soot and dust particles from entering the lungs (cf surgical mask, gas mask, etc.), and a stem *maska, mask- 'black' believed to be of Pre-Indo-European origin giving rise to words meaning 'witch, wizard, sorcerer' (cf Patrono:Pro masco 'witch', Occitan masca 'witch', French masque 'brothel-keeper, witch'); and another perhaps from Arabic مسخرة (maskhara(t)) “buffoon, fool, pleasantry, anything ridiculous” < سخرة (sakhira) “to ridicule, to laugh at”.

PronunciationModificar

NounModificar

Singular
Mask

Plural
Masks

Mask (plural Masks)
  1. A cover, or partial cover, for the face, used for disguise or protection.
    a dancer's mask; a fencer's mask; a ball player's mask
  2. That which disguises; a pretext or subterfuge.
  3. A festive entertainment of dancing or other diversions, where all wear masks; a masquerade; hence, a revel; a frolic; a delusive show - Francis Bacon
    • John Milton:
      This thought might lead me through the world's vain mask.
  4. (obsolete) A dramatic performance, formerly in vogue, in which the actors wore masks and represented mythical or allegorical characters.
  5. (architecture) A grotesque head or face, used to adorn keystones and other prominent parts, to spout water in fountains, and the like; -- called also mascaron.
  6. (fortification) In a permanent fortification, a redoubt which protects the caponiere.
  7. (fortification) A screen for a battery
  8. (zoology) The lower lip of the larva of a dragon fly, modified so as to form a prehensile organ.
  9. (Puebloan anthropology) The ceremonial objects used in Puebloan kachina cults that resemble Euro-American masks. (The term is objected as an appropriate translation by Puebloan peoples as it emphasizes imitation but ignores power and representational intent.)
  10. (computing, programming) A pattern of bits used in bitwise operations; bitmask.
  11. Patrono:Computer A two-color (black and white) bitmap generated from an image, used to create transparency in the image.

Derived termsModificar

TranslationsModificar

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbModificar

Infinitive
to Mask

Third person singular
Masks

Simple past
Masked

Past participle
Masked

Present participle
Masking

to Mask (third-person singular simple present Masks, present participle Masking, simple past and past participle Masked)
  1. (transitive) To cover, as the face, by way of concealment or defense against injury; to conceal with a mask or visor.
    • Shakespeare, Merry Wives of Windsor, IV,vi:
      They must all be masked and vizarded
  2. (transitive) To disguise; to cover; to hide.
    • Shakespeare, Macbeth, III-i:
      Masking the business from the common eye
  3. Patrono:Military To conceal; also, to intervene in the line of.
  4. Patrono:Military To cover or keep in check.
    to mask a body of troops or a fortess by a superior force, while some hostile evolution is being carried out
  5. (intransitive) To take part as a masker in a masquerade - Cavendish.
  6. (intransitive) To wear a mask; to be disguised in any way - Shakespeare.

TranslationsModificar

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

ReferencesModificar

  1. Patrono:R:EWddS

AnagramsModificar


SwedishModificar

Etymology 1Modificar

From Old Norse maðkr (Patrono:Gmq-osw[[Category:sv:Patrono:Gmq-osw derivations|Mask]] maþker). Cognate with English mawk, Danish maddike and Finnish matikka.

PronunciationModificar

NounModificar

Inflection for Mask Singular Plural
common Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Base form Mask Masken Maskar Maskarna
Possessive form Masks Maskens Maskars Maskarnas

Mask c.

  1. worm
Derived termsModificar

Etymology 2Modificar

From French masque < Latin masca. Details: see above, mask.

PronunciationModificar

NounModificar

Inflection for Mask Singular Plural
common Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Base form Mask Masken Masker Maskerna
Possessive form Masks Maskens Maskers Maskernas

Mask c.

  1. mask; a cover designed to disguise or protect the face
Derived termsModificar

de:mask et:mask fa:mask fr:mask ko:mask hy:mask io:mask id:mask it:mask hu:mask ml:mask nl:mask pl:mask ru:mask fi:mask sv:mask ta:mask te:mask tr:mask vi:mask zh:mask

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