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See also Mark, and märk

EnglishModificar

Most common English words: ten « beautiful « possible « #424: mark » followed » fear » evening

Alternative spellingsModificar

PronunciationModificar

Etymology 1Modificar

Old English mearc, from Germanic *mark- ‘boundary; boundary marker’, from Proto-Indo-European *merǵ- ‘boundary, border’. Cognate with Dutch mark, German Mark, Swedish mark; and with Latin margo ‘margin’. Compare march.

NounModificar

Singular
Mark

Plural
Marks

Mark (plural Marks)
  1. boundary, land in a boundary
    1. (obsolete) A boundary; a border or frontier. Patrono:Defdate
    2. (obsolete) A boundary-post or fence. Patrono:Defdate
    3. A stone or post used to indicate position and guide travellers. Patrono:Defdate
      • 1859, Henry Bull, A history, military and municipal, of the ancient borough of the Devizes:
        I do remember a great thron in Yatton field near Bristow-way, against which Sir William Waller's men made a great fire and killed it. I think the stump remains, and was a mark for travellers.
    4. (archaic) A type of small region or principality. Patrono:Defdate
      • 1954, JRR Tolkien, The Two Towers:
        There dwells Théoden son of Thengel, King of the Mark of Rohan.
    5. (historical) A common, or area of common land, especially among early Germanic peoples. Patrono:Defdate
  2. characteristic, sign, visible impression
    1. An omen; a symptomatic indicator of something. Patrono:Defdate
      • 1813, Jane Austen, Pride And Prejudice:
        depend upon it, you will speedily receive from me a letter of thanks for this as well as for every other mark of your regard during my stay in Hertfordshire.
    2. A characteristic feature. Patrono:Defdate
      A good sense of manners is the mark of a true gentleman.
    3. A visible impression or sign; a blemish, scratch, or stain, whether accidental or intentional. Patrono:Defdate
      • 1897, Bram Stoker, Dracula:
        Then she put before her face her poor crushed hands, which bore on their whiteness the red mark of the Count's terrible grip [...].
    4. A sign or brand on a person. Patrono:Defdate
      The Antichrist will show the mark of the beast.
    5. A written character or sign. Patrono:Defdate
      The font wasn't able to render all the diacritical marks properly.
    6. A stamp or other indication of provenance, quality etc. Patrono:Defdate
      With eggs, you need to check for the quality mark before you buy.
    7. (obsolete) Resemblance, likeness, image. Patrono:Defdate
      • ca. 1380, Geoffrey Chaucer, ‘The Franklin's Tale’, Canterbury Tales:
        Which mankynde is so fair part of thy werk / That thou it madest lyk to thyn owene merk.
    8. A particular design or make of an item (now usually with following numeral). Patrono:Defdate
      Presenting...my patented travelator, mark two.
    9. A score for finding the correct answer, or other academic achievement; the sum of such point gained as out of a possible total. Patrono:Defdate
      What mark did you get in your history test?
  3. indicator of position, objective etc.
    1. Patrono:Date A target for shooting at with a projectile.
      • 1786, Francis Grose, A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons, page 37:
        To give them an accurate eye and strength of arm, none under twenty-four years of age might shoot at any standing mark, except it was for a rover, and then he was to change his mark at every shot; and no person above that age might shoot at any mark whose distance was less than eleven score yards.
    2. Patrono:Date An indication or sign used for reference or measurement.
      I filled the bottle up to the 500ml mark.
    3. Patrono:Date The target or intended victim of a swindle, fixed game or con game.
    4. (obsolete, date, 16, 18) The female genitals.
      • 1596, William Shakespeare, Love's Labours Lost, I.4:
        A mark saies my Lady. Let the mark haue a prick in't, to meate at, if it may be.
    5. Patrono:Aussie-rules A catch of the ball directly from a kick of 10 metres or more without having been touched in transit, resulting in a free kick.
    6. Patrono:Sports The line indicating an athlete's starting-point.
    7. Patrono:Date A score for a sporting achievement.
    8. Patrono:Date A specified level on a scale denoting gas-powered oven temperatures.
      Now put the pastry in at 450 degrees, or mark 8.
  4. attention
    1. Patrono:Date (archaic) Attention, notice.
      His last comment is particularly worth of mark.
    2. (archaic, date, 16) Importance, noteworthiness. (Generally in postmodifier "of mark".)
      • 1909, Richard Burton, Masters of the English Novel:
        in the short story of western flavor he was a pioneer of mark, the founder of a genre: probably no other writer is so significant in his field.
Derived termsModificar
TranslationsModificar
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbModificar

Infinitive
to Mark

Third person singular
Marks

Simple past
Marked

Past participle
Marked

Present participle
Marking

to Mark (third-person singular simple present Marks, present participle Marking, simple past and past participle Marked)
  1. To indicate in some way for later reference.
  2. To take note of.
  3. To blemish, scratch, or stain.
  4. To indicate the correctness of and give a score to an essay, exam answers, etc.
  5. (Australian Rules football) To catch the ball directly from a kick of 15 metres or more without having been touched in transit, resulting in a free kick.
  6. Patrono:Sport To follow a player not in possession of the ball when defending, to prevent them receiving a pass easily.
TranslationsModificar
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.
Derived termsModificar

Etymology 2Modificar

Old English marc, from Germanic *mark- (probably ultimately the same as Etymology 1). Cognate with Dutch mark, German Mark.

NounModificar

Singular
Mark

Plural
Marks

Mark (plural Marks)
  1. A measure of weight (especially for gold and silver), once used throughout Europe, equivalent to 8 oz.
    • 1997, As a reward for his poetry, Athelstan gave Egil two more gold rings weighing a mark each, along with an expensive cloak that the king himself had worn. — ‘Egil's Saga’, tr. Bernard Scudder, The Sagas of Icelanders (Penguin 2001, p. 91)
  2. Patrono:Historical An English and Scottish unit of currency (originally valued at one mark weight of silver), equivalent to 13 shillings and fourpence.
  3. Any of various European monetary units, especially the base unit of currency of Germany between 1948 and 2002, equal to 100 pfennigs.
  4. A mark coin.
SynonymsModificar

(German currency): Deutschmark, Deutsche Mark, German mark

TranslationsModificar

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AnagramsModificar


DanishModificar

EtymologyModificar

From Old Norse mǫrk.

PronunciationModificar

  • IPA: /mark/, [mɑːɡ̊]

NounModificar

Mark c. (singular definite Marken, plural indefinite Marker)

  1. field (wide, open space used to grow crops or to hold farm animals)

InflectionModificar

NounModificar

Mark c. (singular definite Marken, plural indefinite Mark)

  1. mark (unit of currency)

InflectionModificar

Derived termsModificar

External linksModificar


FaroeseModificar

NounModificar

mark f.

  1. (kvæði) forest
  2. (in phrases) pasture
  3. Patrono:Biblical field

DeclensionModificar

Patrono:Fo-decl-noun-f2

SynonymsModificar

forrest

pasture

field

NounModificar

mark n.

  1. sign
  2. border, frontier

DeclensionModificar

Patrono:Fo-decl-noun-n3 Patrono:Fo-decl-noun-n5

SynonymsModificar

sign


FrenchModificar

PronunciationModificar

NounModificar

Mark m. (plural Marks)

  1. mark (former currency)

IcelandicModificar

NounModificar

mark n.

  1. sign

See alsoModificar

Derived termsModificar


NorwegianModificar

NounModificar

Mark m.

  1. worm (animal)

Mark f.

  1. march


This Norwegian entry was created from the translations listed at worm. It may be less reliable than other entries, and may be missing parts of speech or additional senses. Please also see Mark in the Norwegian Wiktionary. This notice will be removed when the entry is checked. (more information) August 2009


SwedishModificar

PronunciationModificar

NounModificar

Mark c.

Inflection for Mark Singular Plural
common Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Base form Mark Marken Marker Markerna
Possessive form Marks Markens Markers Markernas

mark

  1. (uncountable) ground (as opposed to the sky or the sea)
    Ha fast mark under fötterna - to be on terra firma (literally "to have firm ground under (one's) feet")
    Tillbaka på klassisk mark - back on classical ground
    På engelsk mark - on English soil
  2. (countable and uncountable) ground, field
    Bonden ägde mycket mark - The farmer owned a lot of ground
  3. mark (currency)
  4. Patrono:Gambling counter, marker

See alsoModificar

ang:mark ar:mark de:mark et:mark el:mark es:mark fr:mark ko:mark io:mark is:mark it:mark kn:mark kk:mark sw:mark ku:mark lt:mark li:mark hu:mark ml:mark nl:mark ja:mark no:mark pl:mark pt:mark ro:mark ru:mark simple:mark fi:mark sv:mark tl:mark ta:mark te:mark th:mark tr:mark vi:mark zh:mark

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