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Middle English medd, madd, from Old English gemǣd 'enraged', from gemād 'silly, mad', from Proto-Germanic *maiđaz (cf. Old High German gimeit 'foolish, crazy', Gothic gamaiþs 'crippled'), past participle of *maiđjanan 'to cripple, injure', from Proto-Indo-European *mei 'to change' (cf. Patrono:Sga máel 'bald, dull', Old Lithuanian ap-maitinti 'to wound', Sanskrit méthati 'he hurts, comes to blows').

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Mad (comparative madder, superlative maddest)
  1. Insane; mentally deranged.
    You want to spend $1000 on a pair of shoes? Are you mad?
    He's got this mad idea that he's irresistible to women.
  2. (chiefly US; UK dated + regional) Angry, annoyed.
    Are you mad at me?
  3. Wildly confused or excited.
  4. Extremely foolish or unwise; irrational; imprudent.
  5. (colloquial) (usually as mad for or mad about) Extremely enthusiastic about; crazy about; infatuated with; overcome with desire for.
    Aren't you just mad for that red dress?
  6. (of animals) abnormally ferocious or furious; or, rabid, affected with rabies.
    A mad dog
  7. (slang, chiefly Northeastern US) Intensifier, signifies an abundance or high quality of a thing; much or many.
    I gotta give you mad props for scoring us those tickets.
    Their lead guitarist has mad skills.
    There's always mad girls at those parties.

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Mad (not comparable)

Positive
Mad

Comparative
not comparable

Superlative
none (absolute)

  1. (slang, chiefly NY) Intensifier; to a large degree; extremely; exceedingly; very; unbelievably.
    He was driving mad slow.
    It's mad hot today.

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Infinitive
to Mad

Third person singular
Mads

Simple past
madded

Past participle
madded

Present participle
madding

to Mad (third-person singular simple present Mads, present participle madding, simple past and past participle madded)
  1. (now colloquial Patrono:Context 5) To madden, to anger, to frustrate.
    • c. 1595, William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of King Richard the Second, Act V Scene 5:
      This musick mads me, let it sound no more.
    • 1621, Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy, I.2.4.iv:
      He that mads others, if he were so humoured, would be as mad himself, as much grieved and tormented [...].

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BretonModificar

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Mad [[Category:Patrono:Bre adjectives|Mad]]

  1. good

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Mad [[Category:Patrono:Bre nouns|Mad]]

  1. goodness

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From Old Norse matr.

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Mad c. (singular definite Maden, not used in plural form)

  1. food

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Mad c. (singular definite madden, plural indefinite madder)

  1. sandwich, bread and butter

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mad

  1. eye

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Mad [[Category:Patrono:Cy adjectives|Mad]]

  1. good
  2. lucky, fortunate
  3. suitable

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Mad m. [[Category:Patrono:Cy nouns|Mad]]

  1. goodness

br:mad da:mad et:mad el:mad es:mad fa:mad fr:mad ko:mad hr:mad io:mad it:mad kn:mad kk:mad ku:mad lo:mad hu:mad ml:mad my:mad no:mad pl:mad pt:mad ru:mad simple:mad fi:mad ta:mad te:mad th:mad vi:mad vo:mad zh:mad

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