FANDOM


Wikipedia

EnglishModificar

EtymologyModificar

Old English liccian, from Proto-Germanic *likkōjanan (cf. East Frisian [[likje#Patrono:Frs|likje]], Dutch likken, German lecken), from Proto-Indo-European *leig̑h- (cf. Irish ligim, Latin lingere 'to lick', liggurīre 'to lap, lick up', Lithuanian liẽžti, Old Church Slavonic lizati, Ancient Greek leíkhein, Armenian lizum, Persian lisidân, Sanskrit léḍhi, réḍhi).

PronunciationModificar

VerbModificar

Infinitive
to Lick

Third person singular
Licks

Simple past
Licked

Past participle
Licked

Present participle
Licking

to Lick (third-person singular simple present Licks, present participle Licking, simple past and past participle Licked)
  1. To stroke with the tongue.
    The cat licked its fur.
  2. (colloquial) To defeat decisively, particularly in a fight.
    My dad can lick your dad.
  3. (colloquial) To overcome.
    I think I can lick this.
  4. (vulgar, slang) To perform cunnilingus.
  5. (colloquial) To do anything partially.

TranslationsModificar

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

NounModificar

File:Marshall-county-indiana-yellow-river.jpg

Singular
Lick

Plural
Licks

Lick (plural Licks)
  1. The act of licking.
    The cat gave its fur a lick.
  2. The amount of some substance obtainable with a single lick.
    Give me a lick of ice cream.
  3. A place where animals lick minerals from the ground.
    The birds gathered at the clay lick.
  4. A small watercourse or ephemeral stream. It ranks between a rill and a stream.
    We used to play in the lick.
  5. (colloquial) A stroke or blow.
    Hit that wedge a good lick with the sledgehammer.
  6. (colloquial) A bit.
    You don't have a lick of sense.
    I didn't do a lick of work today.
  7. (music) A short motif.
    There are some really good blues licks in this solo.
  8. speed. In this sense it is always qualified by good, or fair or a similar adjective.
    The bus was travelling at a good lick when it swerved and left the road.

Related termsModificar

TranslationsModificar

fa:lick fr:lick io:lick id:lick it:lick kn:lick sw:lick hu:lick ml:lick nl:lick oc:lick pl:lick pt:lick ru:lick sv:lick ta:lick te:lick th:lick tr:lick uk:lick vi:lick zh:lick

Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.