FANDOM


EnglishModificar

PronunciationModificar

Etymology 1Modificar

Origin uncertain; perhaps derived from Etymology 2, below.

VerbModificar

Infinitive
to Leer

Third person singular
Leers

Simple past
Leered

Past participle
Leered

Present participle
Leering

to Leer (third-person singular simple present Leers, present participle Leering, simple past and past participle Leered)
  1. (intransitive) To look sideways or obliquely; now especially with sexual desire or malicious intent.
TranslationsModificar

NounModificar

Singular
Leer

Plural
Leers

Leer (plural Leers)
  1. A sly or lecherous look.
TranslationsModificar

Etymology 2Modificar

Middle English ler, leor "face, cheek" from Old English hlēor "face, cheek, profile".

NounModificar

Singular
Leer

Plural
Leers

Leer (plural Leers)
  1. (obsolete) The cheek.
  2. (obsolete) The face; one's appearance, countenance.

AnagramsModificar

Etymology 3Modificar

Middle English lere "empty" from Old English ġelǣre "empty, void, empty-handed".

AdjectiveModificar

Leer (comparative more Leer, superlative most Leer)

Positive
Leer

Comparative
more Leer

Superlative
most Leer

  1. empty, destitute; wanting
  2. faint from lack of food, hungry
  3. having no load or burden

Etymology 4Modificar

Middle English leren "to teach" from Old English lǣran "to teach, instruct". Akin to Old English lār "doctrine, teaching, lore". More at lore.

VerbModificar

Infinitive
to Leer

Third person singular
Leers

Simple past
Leered

Past participle
Leered

Present participle
Leering

to Leer (third-person singular simple present Leers, present participle Leering, simple past and past participle Leered)
  1. to teach
  2. to learn

DanishModificar

NounModificar

Leer c.

  1. Plural indefinite of le.

DutchModificar

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

PronunciationModificar

Etymology 1Modificar

Possibly related to Proto-Germanic *lethram-.

NounModificar

Leer n. (plural leren, diminutive leertje, diminutive plural leertjes)

  1. leather
SynonymsModificar

Etymology 2Modificar

Possibly related to Proto-Germanic *lais-.

NounModificar

Leer f. and m. (plural leren, diminutive leertje, diminutive plural leertjes)

  1. teachings
Derived termsModificar
</div>

VerbModificar

Leer

  1. The first-person singular present indicative of leren.
  2. The imperative of leren.

EstonianModificar

NounModificar

leer

  1. camp

GermanModificar

EtymologyModificar

Old High German lāri

AdjectiveModificar

leer

  1. empty

NorwegianModificar

VerbModificar

leer

  1. Present tense of lee

SpanishModificar

EtymologyModificar

From Latin legere, present active infinitive of legō.

VerbModificar

Leer (first-person singular present leo, first-person singular preterite leí, past participle leído)

  1. to read
    • 1605, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Don Quijote de la Mancha1, Chapter I:
      Patrono:... y llegó a tanto su curiosidad y desatino en esto, que vendió muchas hanegas de tierra de sembradura para comprar libros de caballerías en que leer, y, así, llevó a su casa todos cuantos pudo haber dellos.
      Patrono:... to such a pitch did his eagerness and infatuation go that he sold many an acre of tillageland to buy books of chivalry to read, and brought home as many of them as he could get.
    Quiero leer el periódico.
    I want to read the newspaper.

ConjugationModificar

Patrono:Es-conj-eer

Related termsModificar

ar:leer br:leer cs:leer de:leer et:leer el:leer es:leer fa:leer fr:leer ko:leer io:leer id:leer it:leer kn:leer sw:leer lt:leer li:leer hu:leer nl:leer no:leer oc:leer pl:leer pt:leer ru:leer fi:leer sv:leer ta:leer te:leer vi:leer wo:leer zh:leer

Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.