Wikipedia

English[edit | edit source]

Etymology[edit | edit source]

File:Leaf 1 web.jpg

A leaf.

Middle English leef, from Old English lēaf, from Proto-Germanic *lauƀan (cf. Dutch loof, German Laub), from Proto-Indo-European *leup- 'to peel, break off' (cf. Irish luibh 'herb', Latin liber 'bast; book', Lithuanian lúoba 'bark', Russian lub 'bast', Albanian labë 'rind', Ancient Greek lypē 'great pear').

Pronunciation[edit | edit source]

Noun[edit | edit source]

Wikipedia

Singular
Leaf

Plural
leaves

Leaf (leaves)

  1. The usually green and flat organ that represents the most prominent feature of most vegetative plants.
  2. Anything resembling the leaf of a plant.
  3. A sheet of any substance beaten or rolled until very thin.
    gold leaf
  4. A sheet of a book, magazine, etc (consisting of two pages, one on each face of the leaf).
  5. (in plural) Tea leaves.
  6. A flat section used to extend the size of a table.
  7. A moveable panel, e.g. of a bridge or door, originally one that hinged but now also applied to other forms of movement.
    The train car has one single-leaf and two double-leaf doors per side
  8. (botany) A foliage leaf or any of the many and often considerably different structures it can specialise into.
  9. (computing, mathematics) In a tree, a node that has no descendants.

Derived terms[edit | edit source]

Translations[edit | edit source]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit | edit source]

Infinitive
to Leaf

Third person singular
-

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
-

to Leaf (third-person singular simple present -, present participle -, simple past and past participle -)

  1. (intransitive) To produce leaves; put forth foliage.

Derived terms[edit | edit source]

Translations[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

Anagrams[edit | edit source]


Old English[edit | edit source]

Pronunciation[edit | edit source]

  • IPA: /ˈlæ:ɑf/

Etymology 1[edit | edit source]

From Proto-Germanic *lauƀā. Cognate with Old High German *louba (German Laube).

Noun[edit | edit source]

lēaf f. (plural lēafe)

  1. permission
Descendants[edit | edit source]

Etymology 2[edit | edit source]

From Proto-Germanic *lauƀo-, perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *leup- (to peel, break off). Cognate with Old Saxon lōf (Dutch loof), Old High German loup (German Laub), Old Norse lauf (Danish løv, Swedish löv), Gothic 𐌻𐌰𐌿𐍆𐍃 (laufs).

Noun[edit | edit source]

lēaf n.

  1. leaf
  2. page
Descendants[edit | edit source]

Scots[edit | edit source]

Etymology[edit | edit source]

From Old English lēaf.

Noun[edit | edit source]

Leaf ({{{1}}})

Singular
Leaf

Plural
{{{1}}}

  1. leaf

West Frisian[edit | edit source]

Pronunciation[edit | edit source]

Noun[edit | edit source]

leaf c. (pl. leaven)

  1. leaf, especially a long leaf, like a blade of grass

Adjective[edit | edit source]

leaf (c., pl. form leave)

  1. friendly, kind, cordial

Adverb[edit | edit source]

leaf

  1. in a friendly manner, kindly, cordially

af:leaf ang:leaf ar:leaf zh-min-nan:leaf de:leaf et:leaf el:leaf es:leaf fa:leaf fr:leaf fy:leaf ko:leaf hy:leaf hr:leaf io:leaf id:leaf it:leaf kn:leaf ka:leaf kk:leaf ky:leaf sw:leaf ku:leaf lo:leaf lv:leaf lt:leaf li:leaf hu:leaf ml:leaf nl:leaf ja:leaf no:leaf oc:leaf pl:leaf pt:leaf ro:leaf ru:leaf simple:leaf fi:leaf sv:leaf tl:leaf ta:leaf te:leaf th:leaf tr:leaf vi:leaf zh:leaf

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