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EtymologyModificar

File:Leaf 1 web.jpg

Middle English leef, from Old English lēaf, from Proto-Germanic *lauƀan (cf. Dutch loof, German Laub), from Proto-Indo-European *leup- 'to peel, break off' (cf. Irish luibh 'herb', Latin liber 'bast; book', Lithuanian lúoba 'bark', Russian lub 'bast', Albanian labë 'rind', Ancient Greek lypē 'great pear').

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NounModificar

Wikipedia

Singular
Leaf

Plural
leaves

Leaf (plural leaves)
  1. The usually green and flat organ that represents the most prominent feature of most vegetative plants.
  2. Anything resembling the leaf of a plant.
  3. A sheet of any substance beaten or rolled until very thin.
    gold leaf
  4. A sheet of a book, magazine, etc (consisting of two pages, one on each face of the leaf).
  5. (in plural) Tea leaves.
  6. A flat section used to extend the size of a table.
  7. A moveable panel, e.g. of a bridge or door, originally one that hinged but now also applied to other forms of movement.
    The train car has one single-leaf and two double-leaf doors per side
  8. (botany) A foliage leaf or any of the many and often considerably different structures it can specialise into.
  9. (computing, mathematics) In a tree, a node that has no descendants.

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The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

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Infinitive
to Leaf

Third person singular
Leafs

Simple past
Leafed

Past participle
Leafed

Present participle
Leafing

to Leaf (third-person singular simple present Leafs, present participle Leafing, simple past and past participle Leafed)
  1. (intransitive) To produce leaves; put forth foliage.

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Old EnglishModificar

PronunciationModificar

  • IPA: /ˈlæ:ɑf/

Etymology 1Modificar

From Proto-Germanic *lauƀā. Cognate with Old High German *louba (German Laube).

NounModificar

lēaf f. (plural lēafe)

  1. permission
DescendantsModificar

Etymology 2Modificar

From Proto-Germanic *lauƀo-, perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *leup- (to peel, break off). Cognate with Old Saxon lōf (Dutch loof), Old High German loup (German Laub), Old Norse lauf (Danish løv, Swedish löv), Gothic 𐌻𐌰𐌿𐍆𐍃 (laufs).

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lēaf n.

  1. leaf
  2. page
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ScotsModificar

EtymologyModificar

From Old English lēaf.

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Leaf (plural Leafs)

Singular
Leaf

Plural
Leafs

  1. leaf

West FrisianModificar

PronunciationModificar

NounModificar

leaf c. (pl. leaven)

  1. leaf, especially a long leaf, like a blade of grass

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leaf (c., pl. form leave)

  1. friendly, kind, cordial

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leaf

  1. in a friendly manner, kindly, cordiallyaf:leaf

ang:leaf ar:leaf zh-min-nan:leaf de:leaf et:leaf el:leaf es:leaf fa:leaf fr:leaf fy:leaf ko:leaf hy:leaf hr:leaf io:leaf id:leaf it:leaf kn:leaf ka:leaf kk:leaf ky:leaf sw:leaf ku:leaf lo:leaf lv:leaf lt:leaf li:leaf hu:leaf ml:leaf nl:leaf ja:leaf no:leaf oc:leaf pl:leaf pt:leaf ro:leaf ru:leaf simple:leaf fi:leaf sv:leaf tl:leaf ta:leaf te:leaf th:leaf tr:leaf vi:leaf zh:leaf

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