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EnglishModificar

Most common English words: states « wished « school « #750: language » court » British » meant

EtymologyModificar

Middle English language from Old French language from Vulgar Latin *linguaticum from Latin lingua (tongue, speech, language) from Patrono:OL.[[Category:Patrono:OL. derivations|Language]] dingua "tongue" from Proto-Indo-European *dn̥ǵʰwéh₂s (tongue, speech, language). Displaced native Middle English rearde, ȝerearde "language" (from Old English reord "language, speech"), Middle English londspreche, londspeche "language" (from Old English *landspræc "language, national tongue"), Old English þēod and þēodisc, "language".

PronunciationModificar

NounModificar

Singular
Language

Plural
countable and uncountable; plural Languages

Language (countable and uncountable; plural Languages)
  1. (countable) A form of communication using words either spoken or gestured with the hands and structured with grammar, often with a writing system.
    the English language
    sign language
    • 1900, William Beckford, The History of the Caliph Vathek[1], page 50:
      "No language could express his rage and despair."</span>
  2. (uncountable) The ability to communicate using words.
    the gift of language
  3. (countable or uncountable) Nonverbal communication.
    body language
  4. (computing, countable) A computer language.
  5. (uncountable) The vocabulary and usage used in a particular specialist field.
    legal language
  6. (uncountable) The particular words used in speech or a passage of text.
    The language he used to talk to me was obscene.
    The language used in the law does not permit any other interpretation.
  7. (uncountable) Profanity.
    • 1978, James Carroll, Mortal Friends[2], ISBN 0440157897, page 500:
      "Where the hell is Horace?" ¶"There he is. He's coming. You shouldn't use language."</span>

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TranslationsModificar

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

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FrenchModificar

NounModificar

Language m. (plural Languages)

  1. Patrono:Archaic spelling of

Middle FrenchModificar

NounModificar

Patrono:Frm-noun

  1. language (style of communicating)

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Old FrenchModificar

Alternative formsModificar

EtymologyModificar

Late Latin *linguaticum, from Classical Latin lingua (tongue, language).

NounModificar

Patrono:Fro-noun-f

  1. language (style of communicating)

DescendantsModificar

See alsoModificar

ar:language roa-rup:language ast:language zh-min-nan:language bs:language ca:language cs:language de:language et:language el:language es:language fa:language fr:language fy:language gl:language gu:language ko:language hy:language io:language id:language is:language it:language kn:language kk:language ky:language ku:language lo:language lt:language li:language jbo:language hu:language ml:language my:language nl:language ja:language no:language km:language pl:language pt:language qu:language ru:language sg:language simple:language sr:language fi:language sv:language tl:language ta:language te:language th:language tr:language tk:language uk:language vi:language yi:language zh:language

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