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EnglishModificar

EtymologyModificar

First coined 1382, Old French jalous, from Late Latin zelosus < Ancient Greek ζήλος (zēlos), zeal, jealousy) < ζηλόω (zēloō), to emulate, to be jealous). Cognate to zeal.

PronunciationModificar

AdjectiveModificar

Jealous (comparative more Jealous, superlative most Jealous)

Positive
Jealous

Comparative
more Jealous

Superlative
most Jealous

  1. (colloquial, proscribed) envious
    He is jealous of the success of others
  2. Bitterly or enviously competitive.
  3. Suspecting rivalry.
  4. Fearful of being replaced, in position or in affection.
  5. Protective, guarding.

Usage notesModificar

Using “jealous” to mean “envious” is proscribed, but widely used. Careful use distinguishes these, using jealous to mean “protective of one’s own position or possessions” – one “jealously guards what one has” – and envious to mean “desirous of others’ position or possessions” – one “envies what others have”.[1]

Derived termsModificar

Related termsModificar

TranslationsModificar

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

ReferencesModificar

  1. Envious/Jealous”, Paul Brians, Common Errors in English Usage

AnagramsModificar

et:jealous es:jealous fr:jealous ko:jealous hy:jealous io:jealous id:jealous it:jealous kn:jealous hu:jealous ml:jealous my:jealous pl:jealous simple:jealous fi:jealous ta:jealous te:jealous th:jealous vi:jealous zh:jealous

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