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See also Jack

English[edit | edit source]

File:Jackscrew.gif

A jack (mechanical device)

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Pronunciation[edit | edit source]

Etymology 1[edit | edit source]

From Middle English jakke (any mechanical device), from the name Jack, from Old French Jacques

Noun[edit | edit source]

Singular
Jack

Plural
{{{1}}}

Jack ({{{1}}})

  1. A mechanical device used to raise and (temporarily) support a heavy object.
    She used a jack to lift her car and changed the tire.
  2. A man or men in general.
    • Every man jack.
  3. A male animal.
  4. Template:Card games The card ranking between the ten and queen of any suit, picturing a knave or prince on its face. In some card games has a value of eleven based on its rank, but in many card games has a value of ten like the ten, queen, and king cards. Also called a knave.
  5. (archaic) A knave (a servant or later, a deceitful man).
    • 1799, THE SCOTS MAGAZINE OR GENERAL REPOSITORY OF LITERATURE, HISTORY, AND POLITICS[1], page 171:
      Fly may signify a winged insect, or part of a Jack. Jack itself is sometimes a roaster of meat, and at others a contraction of John, a knave, a Japan mug, or an instrument to draw off boots.
  6. (zoology) A male ass.
  7. A surface-mounted connector for electrical, especially telecommunications, equipment.
    telephone jack
  8. Template:Sports A target ball in bowls, etc; a jack-ball.
  9. Template:Games A small, six-pointed playing piece used in the game of jacks.
  10. (colloquial) Nothing, jackshit.
    You haven't done jack. Get up and get this room cleaned up right now!
  11. Template:Nautical A small flag at the bow of a ship.
  12. Template:Nautical A naval ensign flag flown from the main mast, mizzen mast, or the aft-most major mast of (especially) British sailing warships; Union Jack.
  13. Template:Military A coarse and cheap medieval coat of defense, especially one made of leather.
    • 1786, Francis Grose, A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons, page 15:
      The aketon, gambeson, vambasium, and jack were military vestments, calculated for the defence of the body, differing little from each other, except in their names, their materials and construction were nearly the same, the authorities quoted in the notes, shew they were all composed of many folds of linen, stuffed with cotton, wool or hair, quilted, and commonly covered with leather, made of buck or doe skin.
  14. Template:Two-up A penny with a head on both sides, used for cheating. (Reference: Sidney J. Baker, The Australian Language, second edition, 1966, chapter XI section 3, page 243.)
  15. (slang) Money.
  16. (slang, Appalachians) A smooth often ovoid large gravel or small cobble in a natural water course.
  17. A common name for the freshwater pike, green pike or pickerel.
  18. Large California rockfish.
  19. An order of marine fish in the Carangidae family.
  20. (obsolete, nautical) A sailor; a "jack tar".
Synonyms[edit | edit source]
Derived terms[edit | edit source]
Translations[edit | edit source]

Verb[edit | edit source]

Infinitive
to Jack

Third person singular
-

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
-

to Jack (third-person singular simple present -, present participle -, simple past and past participle -)

  1. (transitive) To use a jack.
    He jacked the car up so that he could replace the brake pads.
  2. (transitive, colloquial) To steal something, typically an automobile.
    Someone jacked my car last night!

Derived terms[edit | edit source]

Translations[edit | edit source]

Etymology 3[edit | edit source]

Template:Etystub

Verb[edit | edit source]

Infinitive
to Jack

Third person singular
-

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
-

to Jack (third-person singular simple present -, present participle -, simple past and past participle -)

  1. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) (transitive, slang, baseball) To hit the ball hard.
    Jones jacks it into the alley, clearing the bases.
  2. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) (transitive, slang, baseball) To hit a home run.


Derived terms[edit | edit source]
Translations[edit | edit source]

Interjection[edit | edit source]

Jack

  1. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) (slang, baseball) A player has hit a home run
    Jack! Tie score.

References[edit | edit source]


Dutch[edit | edit source]

Noun[edit | edit source]

Jack n. (plural jacks, diminutive Jackje, diminutive plural Jackjes)

  1. jacket

el:jack es:jack fr:jack io:jack it:jack kn:jack kk:jack rw:jack li:jack hu:jack ml:jack my:jack nl:jack pl:jack pt:jack ro:jack ru:jack simple:jack fi:jack sv:jack ta:jack te:jack uk:jack vi:jack zh:jack

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