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EnglishModificar

Etymology 1Modificar

From ecclesiastical Latin incarnatus, past participle of incarnari (be made flesh), from in- + caro (flesh).

PronunciationModificar

  • IPA: /ɪnˈkɑ:neɪt/, /ɪnˈkɑ:nət/

AdjectiveModificar

Incarnate (comparative more Incarnate, superlative most Incarnate)

Positive
Incarnate

Comparative
more Incarnate

Superlative
most Incarnate

  1. Embodied in flesh; given a bodily, especially a human, form; personified.
  2. (obsolete) Flesh-colored, crimson.

Etymology 2Modificar

From the past participle stem of Latin incarnare (make flesh), from in- + caro (flesh).

PronunciationModificar

  • IPA: /ˈɪnkɑ:neɪt/, /ɪnˈkɑ:neɪt/

VerbModificar

Infinitive
to Incarnate

Third person singular
incarnates

Simple past
incarnated

Past participle
incarnated

Present participle
incarnating

to Incarnate (third-person singular simple present incarnates, present participle incarnating, simple past and past participle incarnated)
  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To incarn; to become covered with flesh, to heal over.
  2. (transitive) To make carnal, to reduce the spiritual nature of.
  3. (transitive) To embody in flesh, invest with a bodily, especially a human, form.
  4. (transitive) To put into or represent in a concrete form, as an idea.

QuotationsModificar

For examples of the usage of this term see the citations page.

Related termsModificar

AnagramsModificar


ItalianModificar

VerbModificar

incarnate

  1. Second-person plural present tense of incarnare.
  2. Second-person plural imperative of incarnare#Italian.
  3. Feminine plural of incarnato.

AnagramsModificar

fr:incarnate io:incarnate kn:incarnate no:incarnate pl:incarnate pt:incarnate ru:incarnate fi:incarnate ta:incarnate te:incarnate vi:incarnate zh:incarnate

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