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EnglishModificar

EtymologyModificar

From Latin imperātīvus.

PronunciationModificar

  • (US) IPA: /ɪmˈpɛɹ.ə.tɪv/

NounModificar

Singular
Imperative

Plural
countable and uncountable; plural Imperatives

Imperative (countable and uncountable; plural Imperatives)
  1. (uncountable, grammar) The grammatical mood expressing an order (see jussive). In English, the imperative form of a verb is the same as that of the bare infinitive.
    The verbs in sentences like "Do it!" and "Say what you like!" are in the imperative.
  2. (countable, grammar) A verb in imperative mood.
  3. (countable) An essential action, a must: something which is imperative.
    Visiting Berlin is an imperative.

SynonymsModificar

Derived termsModificar

TranslationsModificar

AdjectiveModificar

Imperative (comparative more Imperative, superlative most Imperative)

Positive
Imperative

Comparative
more Imperative

Superlative
most Imperative

  1. essential
    It is imperative that you come here right now.
  2. Patrono:Comptheory Having a semantics that incorporates mutable variables.

TranslationsModificar


ItalianModificar

AdjectiveModificar

imperative pl.

  1. Feminine form of imperativo.

AnagramsModificar


LatinModificar

Alternative formsModificar

EtymologyModificar

From imperātīvus (commanded), from imperō (command, order), from im- (form of in) + parō (prepare, arrange; intend).

AdverbModificar

imperātīvē (not comparable)
  1. In an imperative manner, imperatively.

Related termsModificar

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ReferencesModificar

  • Imperative” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879

cs:imperative de:imperative et:imperative el:imperative fa:imperative fr:imperative fy:imperative io:imperative it:imperative ka:imperative kn:imperative lt:imperative hu:imperative ml:imperative pl:imperative ru:imperative fi:imperative ta:imperative te:imperative tr:imperative vi:imperative zh:imperative

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