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EnglishModificar

EtymologyModificar

Middle English haunten from Old French hanter "to inhabit" of Patrono:Gem[[Category:Patrono:Gem derivations|Haunt]] origin, from Old Norse heimta "to bring home" from Proto-Germanic *khaimat-janan from Proto-Germanic *khaimaz (home). Akin to Old English hāmettan "to reside, bring home", Old English hām "home". More at home

PronunciationModificar

VerbModificar

Infinitive
to Haunt

Third person singular
Haunts

Simple past
Haunted

Past participle
Haunted

Present participle
Haunting

to Haunt (third-person singular simple present Haunts, present participle Haunting, simple past and past participle Haunted)
  1. (transitive) To inhabit, or visit frequently (most often used in reference to ghosts).
  2. (transitive) To make uneasy.
    The memory of his past failures haunted him.
  3. (transitive) To stalk, to follow
    The policeman haunted him, following him everywhere.
  4. (intransitive, now rare) To live habitually.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.x:
      yonder in that wastefull wildernesse / Huge monsters haunt, and many dangers dwell [...].

TranslationsModificar

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NounModificar

Singular
Haunt

Plural
Haunts

Haunt (plural Haunts)
  1. A place one is regularly found at; a hangout.
  2. Patrono:Dialect A ghost.
    • 1891, Mary Noailles Murfree, In the "Stranger People's" Country, Nebraska 2005, p. 93:
      Harnts don't wander much ginerally,’ he said. ‘They hand round thar own buryin'-groun' mainly.’
  3. A feeding place for animals.

TranslationsModificar

  • Italian: ritrovo (1), fantasma (2)

AnagramsModificar

el:haunt fa:haunt fr:haunt io:haunt it:haunt kn:haunt hu:haunt ru:haunt fi:haunt ta:haunt te:haunt vi:haunt zh:haunt

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