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See also Harrow

English[]

Wikipedia

File:Kverneland harrow.jpg

Harrow

Pronunciation[]

Etymology 1[]

Either representing unattested Old English *hearwe or *hearġe (perhaps ultimately cognate with harvest), or from Old Norse harfr/herfi[1]; compare Danish harve (harrow), Dutch hark (rake). Akin to Latin carpere.

Noun[]

Singular
Harrow

Plural
{{{1}}}

Harrow ({{{1}}})

  1. A device consisting of a heavy framework having several disks or teeth in a row, which is dragged across ploughed land to smooth or break up the soil, to remove weeds or cover seeds; a harrow plow.
    • 1918, Louise & Aylmer Maude, trans. Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina, Oxford 1998, p. 153:
      He sent for the carpenter, who was under contract to be with the threshing-machine, but it turned out that he was mending the harrows, which should have been mended the week before Lent.
    • 1969, Bessie Head, When Rain Clouds Gather, Heinemann 1995, p. 28:
      Part of your job would be to learn tractor ploughing and the use of planters, harrows, and cultivators.
Translations[]

Verb[]

Infinitive
to Harrow

Third person singular
-

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
-

to Harrow (third-person singular simple present -, present participle -, simple past and past participle -)

  1. To drag a harrow over; to break up with a harrow.
    • 1719- Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe
      When the corn was sown, I had no harrow, but was forced to go over it myself, and drag a great heavy bough of a tree over it, to scratch it, as it may be called, rather than rake or harrow it.
  2. To traumatize or disturb; to frighten or torment.
    The headless horseman harrowed Ichabod Crane as he tried to reach the bridge.
Derived terms[]
Translations[]

Etymology 2[]

From Old French haro, harou, of uncertain origin.

Interjection[]

Harrow

  1. (obsolete) A call for help, or of distress, alarm etc.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.vi:
      Harrow, the flames, which me consume (said hee) / Ne can be quencht, within my secret bowels bee.

References[]

  1. According to ODS eng. harrow maaske laant fra nordisk, Eng. harrow probably loaned from Norse

et:harrow fa:harrow fr:harrow ko:harrow io:harrow it:harrow kn:harrow lt:harrow ml:harrow pl:harrow ru:harrow fi:harrow ta:harrow te:harrow vi:harrow zh:harrow

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