Wikipedia

File:Hand parts.jpg

A human hand.

See also Hand

English[edit | edit source]

Most common English words: though « get « eyes « #151: hand » young » place » give

Wikipedia

Etymology[edit | edit source]

Old English hand, from Proto-Germanic *xanđuz (cf. Frisian/Dutch/German hand), from *xenþanan (cf. Old Swedish hinna 'to gain', Gothic fra-hinþan 'to take captive, capture'); origin unknown, although some theorize Proto-Indo-European *ḱent- (to grasp).

Pronunciation[edit | edit source]

Noun[edit | edit source]

Singular
Hand

Plural
{{{1}}}

Hand ({{{1}}})

  1. That part of the fore limb below the forearm or wrist in a human, and the corresponding part in many other animals; manus; paw. See manus.
  2. That which resembles, or to some extent performs the office of, a human hand; as,
    (a) A limb of certain animals, as the foot of a hawk, or any one of the four extremities of a monkey.
    (b) An index or pointer on a dial; such as the hour or minute hand of a clock
  3. In long measure, two different lengths:
    • (obsolete) Three inches, not to be confused with; and,
    • Four inches, a hand’s breadth, used in measuring the height of horses.
  4. A side; part, camp; direction, either right or left.
    • On this hand and that hand, were hangings. — Exodus 38:15
    • The Protestants were then on the winning handJohn Milton
  5. Power of performance; means of execution; ability; skill; dexterity.
    • He had a great mind to try his hand at a Spectator. — Joseph Addison
  6. (archaic) Actual performance; deed; act; workmanship; agency; hence, manner of performance.
    • To change the hand in carrying on the war. — Edward Hyde Clarendon
    • Gideon said unto God, If thou wilt save Israel by my hand. — Judges 6:36
  7. An agent; a servant, or manual laborer, especially in compounds; a workman, trained or competent for special service or duty; a performer more or less skillful; as,
    an old hand at speaking.
    • A dictionary containing a natural history requires too many hands, as well as too much time, ever to be hoped for. — John Locke
    • I was always reckoned a lively hand at a simile. — William Hazlitt
  8. An instance of helping.
    Bob gave Alice a hand to move the furniture.
  9. Handwriting; style of penmanship; as,
    A good, bad or running hand. Hence, a signature.
    • I say she never did invent this letter; This is a man’s invention and his hand — Shakespeare, As You Like It, IV-iii
    • Some writs require a judge’s handBurril
    • 1883, Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island
      I found written on the other side, in a very good, clear hand, this short message...
  10. Personal possession; ownership; hence, control; direction; management; — usually in the plural.
    • Receiving in hand one year’s tribute. — Knolles
    • John Milton, Albinus
      ...found means to keep in his hands the government of Britain.
  11. That which is, or may be, held in a hand at once; as
    (a) Template:Gaming: The set of cards held by a player.
    (b) (Tobacco Manufacturing): A bundle of tobacco leaves tied together.
  12. Applause.
    Give him a hand.
  13. Agency in transmission from one person to another; as,
    to buy at first hand, that is, from the producer, or when new; at second hand, that is, when no longer in the producer’s hand, or when not new.
  14. The feel of a fabric; the impression or quality of the fabric as judged qualitatively by the sense of touch.
    This fabric has a smooth, soft hand.'
  15. (obsolete) Rate; price.
    • Business is bought at a dear hand, where there is small dispatch. — Francis Bacon
  16. Each of the pointers on the face of an analog clock, which are used to indicate the time of day.
  17. (firearms) The small part of a gunstock near the lock, which is grasped by the hand in taking aim.
  18. The collective noun for a bunch of bananas.

Usage notes[edit | edit source]

Hand is used figuratively for a large variety of acts or things, in the doing, or making, or use of which the hand is in some way employed or concerned; also, as a symbol to denote various qualities or conditions, as,

(a) Activity; operation; work; — in distinction from the head, which implies thought, and the heart, which implies affection.
His hand will be against every man. — Genesis 16:12
(b) Power; might; supremacy; — often in the Scriptures.
With a mighty hand . . . will I rule over you. — Ezekiel 20:33.
(c) Fraternal feeling; as, to give, or take, the hand; to give the right hand
(d) Contract; — commonly of marriage; as, to ask the hand; to pledge the hand.

Quotations[edit | edit source]

  • 1611King James Version of the Bible, Luke 1:1
    Forasmuch as many have taken in hand to set forth in order a declaration of those things which are most surely believed among us...

Meronyms[edit | edit source]

Derived terms[edit | edit source]

Translations[edit | edit source]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See also[edit | edit source]

Appendix: Collective nouns

Verb[edit | edit source]

Infinitive
to Hand

Third person singular
-

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
-

to Hand (third-person singular simple present -, present participle -, simple past and past participle -)

  1. (transitive) To give, pass, or transmit with the hand; as
    he handed them the letter.
  2. (transitive) To lead, guide, or assist with the hand; to conduct
    to hand a lady into a carriage.
  3. (transitive) (obsolete) To manage; as, I hand my oar. — Matthew Prior
  4. (transitive) (obsolete) To seize; to lay hands on. — Shakespeare
  5. (transitive) (rare) To pledge by the hand; to handfast.
  6. (transitive) Template:Nautical To furl; — said of a sail. — Totten
  7. (intransitive) (obsolete) To cooperate. — Massinger

Derived terms[edit | edit source]

Translations[edit | edit source]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

References[edit | edit source]

Anagrams[edit | edit source]


Dutch[edit | edit source]

Pronunciation[edit | edit source]

Noun[edit | edit source]

Hand f. (plural handen, diminutive handje, diminutive plural handjes)

  1. (anatomy) hand of a human or other simian

Derived terms[edit | edit source]


French[edit | edit source]

Pronunciation[edit | edit source]

Noun[edit | edit source]

Hand m (usually uncountable)

  1. (informal) handball
    On va jouer au hand, tu veux venir?
    We're going to play handball, you want to come?

Synonyms[edit | edit source]


Old English[edit | edit source]

Etymology[edit | edit source]

Proto-Germanic *handuz

Noun[edit | edit source]

hand f.

  1. hand

Swedish[edit | edit source]

Pronunciation[edit | edit source]

Noun[edit | edit source]

Inflection for Hand Singular Plural
common Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Base form Hand Handen händer händerna
Possessive form Hands Handens händers händernas
  1. (anatomy) hand; the body part
    Han tjatade jämt om att hon måste tvätta händerna.
    He was always nagging on her to wash her hands.
  2. Template:Card games hand; the set of cards held by a player
    Hon fick en bra hand, och satsade högt.
    She was dealt a good set of cards, and placed a high bet.

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