FANDOM


EnglishModificar

PronunciationModificar

Etymology 1Modificar

Wikipedia

From Old English hālġa, from hāliġ (holy)

NounModificar

Singular
Hallow

Plural
Hallows

Hallow (plural Hallows)
  1. (archaic) A holy person; a saint.
    • All Hallows Eve (or Halloween), the night before All Hallows Day (now more commonly known as "All Saints Day").
TranslationsModificar

VerbModificar

Infinitive
to Hallow

Third person singular
Hallows

Simple past
Hallowed

Past participle
Hallowed

Present participle
Hallowing

to Hallow (third-person singular simple present Hallows, present participle Hallowing, simple past and past participle Hallowed)
  1. (transitive) To make holy, to sanctify.
    • 1847: Come hallow the goblet with something more true
      Than words we forget in a minute. — Patrono:Cite book
TranslationsModificar

Etymology 2Modificar

From Old French halloer

VerbModificar

Infinitive
to Hallow

Third person singular
Hallows

Simple past
Hallowed

Past participle
Hallowed

Present participle
Hallowing

to Hallow (third-person singular simple present Hallows, present participle Hallowing, simple past and past participle Hallowed)
  1. To shout, especially to urge on dogs for hunting.

NounModificar

Singular
Hallow

Plural
Hallows

Hallow (plural Hallows)
  1. A shout, cry; a hulloo.
    • 1777: Then away they went from merry Sherwood / And into Yorkshire he did hie / And the King did follow, with a hoop and a hallow / But could not come him nigh. — Robin Hood's Chase, reprinted in Patrono:Cite book
    • 1772: I told them, the sherriff could not be admitted on board this time of night, on which they set up a hallow and rowed as fast as they could towards the vessel's bows. — Patrono:Cite book


de:hallow fa:hallow io:hallow hu:hallow ka:hallow ml:hallow pt:hallow ru:hallow fi:hallow ta:hallow te:hallow vi:hallow zh:hallow

Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.