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See also häck, and Hack

EnglishModificar

PronunciationModificar

Etymology 1Modificar

From Old English tohaccian (hack to pieces)

VerbModificar

Infinitive
to Hack

Third person singular
Hacks

Simple past
Hacked

Past participle
Hacked

Present participle
Hacking

to Hack (third-person singular simple present Hacks, present participle Hacking, simple past and past participle Hacked)
  1. To chop or cut down in a rough manner.
    They hacked the brush down and made their way through the jungle.
  2. To cough noisily.
    This cold is awful. I can't stop hacking.
  3. To withstand or put up with a difficult situation.
    Can you hack it out here with no electricity or running water?
  4. (slang, computing) To hack into; to gain unauthorized access to a computer system (e.g. website) or network by manipulating code; a crack.
  5. (computing) To accomplish a difficult programming task.
    He can hack like no one else and make the program work as expected.
  6. (computing) To make a quick code change to patch a computer program, often one that is inelegant or that makes the program harder to maintain.
    I hacked in a fix for this bug, but we'll still have to do a real fix later.
  7. To work on an intimately technical level.
    I'm currently hacking distributed garbage collection.
  8. Patrono:Ice hockey To strike an opponent's leg with one's hockey stick.
    He's going to the penalty box after hacking the defender in front of the goal.
  9. Patrono:Ice hockey To make a flailing attempt to hit the puck with a hockey stick.
    There's a scramble in front of the net as the forwards are hacking at the bouncing puck.
  10. (baseball) To swing at a pitched ball.
    He went to the batter's box hacking.
Derived termsModificar
SynonymsModificar
TranslationsModificar

NounModificar

Singular
Hack

Plural
Hacks

Hack (plural Hacks)
  1. A hacking blow.
  2. A gouge or notch made by such a blow.
  3. Patrono:Curling The foothold traditionally cut into the ice from which the person who throws the rock pushes off for delivery.
  4. (obsolete) A mattock or a miner's pick.
  5. A dry cough.
  6. (computing, slang) An illegal attempt to gain access to a computer network.
  7. (computing) An interesting technical achievement, particularly in computer programming.
  8. (computing) A small code change meant to patch a problem as quickly as possible.
  9. (computing) An expedient, temporary solution, meant to be replaced with a more elegant solution at a later date.
  10. (slang, military) Time check.
  11. (baseball) A swing of the bat at a pitched ball by the batter.
    He took a few hacks, but the pitcher finally struck him out.
QuotationsModificar

For examples of the usage of this term see the citations page.

SynonymsModificar
Related termsModificar
TranslationsModificar

Etymology 2Modificar

Variations of hatch, heck.

NounModificar

Singular
Hack

Plural
Hacks

Hack (plural Hacks)
  1. (falconry) A board which the falcon's food is placed on; used by extension for the state of partial freedom in which they are kept before being trained.
  2. A food-rack for cattle.
  3. A rack used to dry bricks.

VerbModificar

Infinitive
to Hack

Third person singular
Hacks

Simple past
Hacked

Past participle
Hacked

Present participle
Hacking

to Hack (third-person singular simple present Hacks, present participle Hacking, simple past and past participle Hacked)
  1. To lay (bricks) on a rack to dry.
  2. (falconry) To keep (young hawks) in a state of partial freedom, before they are trained.

Etymology 3Modificar

Abbreviation of hackney (an ordinary horse), probably from place name Hackney

NounModificar

Singular
Hack

Plural
Hacks

Hack (plural Hacks)
  1. (obsolete) An ordinary horse, especially an old, tired one.
  2. (slang) A taxicab (hackney cab) driver.
  3. (pejorative) One who is professionally successful despite producing mediocre work. (Usually applied to persons in a creative field.)
  4. (pejorative) A talented writer-for-hire, paid to put others' thoughts into felicitous language.
  5. (pejorative) An untalented writer.
    Dason is nothing but a two-bit hack.
  6. Patrono:Politics A political agitator. (slightly derogatory)
TranslationsModificar

VerbModificar

Infinitive
to Hack

Third person singular
Hacks

Simple past
Hacked

Past participle
Hacked

Present participle
Hacking

to Hack (third-person singular simple present Hacks, present participle Hacking, simple past and past participle Hacked)
  1. (dated) To make common or cliched; to vulgarise.
  2. To ride a horse at a regular pace; to ride on a road (as opposed to riding cross-country etc.).

AdjectiveModificar

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Hack (not comparable)

Positive
Hack

Comparative
not comparable

Superlative
none (absolute)

  1. (literary) Having or requiring little talent.
    He's nothing but the typical hack writer.
    I got by on hack work for years before I finally published my novel.

Etymology 4Modificar

From hackysack

NounModificar

Singular
Hack

Plural
Hacks

Hack (plural Hacks)
  1. A small ball usually made of woven cotton or suede and filled with rice, sand or some other filler, for the use in hackeysack.
TranslationsModificar

VerbModificar

Infinitive
to Hack

Third person singular
Hacks

Simple past
Hacked

Past participle
Hacked

Present participle
Hacking

to Hack (third-person singular simple present Hacks, present participle Hacking, simple past and past participle Hacked)
  1. To play hackeysack.
TranslationsModificar
et:hack

es:hack fa:hack fr:hack io:hack it:hack kn:hack ml:hack my:hack ru:hack fi:hack ta:hack te:hack vi:hack zh:hack

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