Interlingua Wiki
Advertisement

English[]

Etymology[]

1563, from French Gaule "Gaul" from Middle French Gaule "Gaul" from Old French Gaule, Waulle (used to translate Latin Gallia "Gaul"), of Template:Gem[[Category:Template:Gem derivations|Gaul]] origin, from Template:Frk *Walholant "Gaul, Land of the Romans/foreigners" from Template:Frk[[Category:Template:Frk derivations|Gaul]] *Walha "foreigners, Romans, Celts" from Proto-Germanic *Walχaz, Walχoz (an outlander, foreigner, Celt), probably of Template:Cel[[Category:Template:Cel derivations|Gaul]] origin, from the same source as Latin Volcae (name of a Celtic tribe in S. Germany, which later emmigrated to Gaul). Akin to Old High German Walh, Walah "a Celt, Roman, Gaul", Old English Wealh, Walh "a non-Germanic foreigner, Celt/Briton/Welshman", Old Norse Valir "Gauls, Frenchmen". More at Wales, Cornwall, Walloon.

Despite their similar appearance, Latin Gallia is probably not the origin of French Gaul; the similarity being purely coincidental. According to regular sound changes in the development of Old French, Latin g before a becomes j (compare gamba > jambe), and the i of terminal -ia transpositions to the preceding syllable (compare gloria > gloire). Thus, the regular outcome of Latin Gallia is Jaille, a component still seen in several French placenames (eg. La Jaille-Yvon, Saint-Mars-la-Jaille, etc).

Pronunciation[]

Proper noun[]

Singular
Gaul

Plural
s

Gaul (s)

  1. (uncountable) A Roman-era region roughly corresponding to modern France and Belgium
  2. (countable) A person from that region.

Translations[]

Related terms[]

Anagrams[]

  • aglu,
  • Agul

German[]

Etymology[]

From Template:Gmh[[Category:de:Template:Gmh derivations|Gaul]] [[gūl#Template:Gmh|gūl]]

Pronunciation[]

Noun[]

Gaul m. (plural Gäule)

  1. horse
  2. hack, nag (bad, old or incapable horse)

de:Gaul el:Gaul fr:Gaul ko:Gaul io:Gaul hu:Gaul no:Gaul pl:Gaul pt:Gaul ru:Gaul fi:Gaul tr:Gaul zh:Gaul