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See also Fay

EnglishModificar

PronunciationModificar

Etymology 1Modificar

From Middle English feyen, feien "to fay" from Old English fēgan "to join, unite" from Proto-Germanic *fōgianan (to join) from PGmc base *fōgō (joint, slot) from Proto-Indo-European *pak'- (to fasten, place). Akin to Patrono:Ofs [[fogia#Patrono:Ofs|fōgia]] "to join", Old Saxon fōgian "to join" (Dutch voegen "to place"), Old High German fuogen "to connect" (German fügen "to connect"), Old English fōn "to catch". More at fang.

VerbModificar

Infinitive
to Fay

Third person singular
Fays

Simple past
Fayed

Past participle
Fayed

Present participle
Faying

to Fay (third-person singular simple present Fays, present participle Faying, simple past and past participle Fayed)
  1. To fit.
  2. To join or unite closely or tightly.
  3. To lie close together.
  4. To fadge.
Derived termsModificar

Etymology 2Modificar

Middle English faie, fei (a place or person possessed with magical properties), from Middle French feie, fee (fairy", "fae). More at fairy.

NounModificar

Singular
Fay

Plural
Fays

Fay (plural Fays)
  1. A fairy; an elf.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.ii:
      that mighty Princesse did complaine / Of grieuous mischiefes, which a wicked Fay / Had wrought [...].
TranslationsModificar
See alsoModificar

AnagramsModificar

de:fay fr:fay ko:fay io:fay lo:fay ml:fay nl:fay ru:fay tr:fay vi:fay wo:fay zh:fay

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