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English[]

Wikipedia

Etymology[]

From Latin fama (talk, rumor, report, reputation), from Ancient Greek φήμη (phēmē), talk), from Proto-Indo-European *bheH₂-mā-, from *bheH₂- (to speak).

Pronunciation[]

Noun[]

Singular
Fame

Plural
-

Fame (-)

  1. (rare) What is said or reported; gossip, rumour.
    • 1667, There went a fame in Heav'n that he ere long / Intended to create, and therein plant / A generation, whom his choice regard / Should favour — John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book 1, ll. 651-4
  2. The state of being famous or well-known and spoken of.

Derived terms[]

  • hall of fame
  • walk of fame

Translations[]

Verb[]

Infinitive
to Fame

Third person singular
fam

Simple past
-

Past participle
-

Present participle
es

to Fame (third-person singular simple present fam, present participle es, simple past and past participle -)

  1. (transitive) to make (someone or something) famous

Related terms[]

Anagrams[]

  • aefm,
  • FEMA

Galician[]

Noun[]

Fame f. (plural Fames)

  1. hunger

Synonyms[]

  • (hunger): apetito

Italian[]

Etymology[]

Latin fames

Pronunciation[]

  • IPA: [ˈfaː.me], /ˈfame/, SAMPA: /"fame/
  • Hyphenation: fà‧me

Noun[]

fame f. (plural fami)

  1. hunger
    Ho fame. - I'm hungry.

Related terms[]

Noun[]

fame f.

  1. Plural form of fama.

Old French[]

Alternative forms[]

  • fam

Etymology[]

Latin femina.

Noun[]

Template:Fro-noun-f

  1. wife, female partner
  2. woman

Usage notes[]

  • unlike modern French, fam usually refers to a wife, while dame refers to a woman

Descendants[]

  • French: femme

ang:fame cs:fame co:fame de:fame et:fame el:fame fa:fame fr:fame gl:fame ko:fame io:fame id:fame it:fame kn:fame sw:fame ku:fame lt:fame hu:fame ml:fame my:fame nl:fame ja:fame oc:fame pl:fame ro:fame ru:fame fi:fame ta:fame te:fame tr:fame vi:fame zh:fame

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