FANDOM


EnglishModificar

Etymology 1Modificar

From Latin fābulātus, perfect passive participle of fābulor (tell stories, chat), from fābula (fable).

VerbModificar

Infinitive
to Fabulate

Third person singular
Fabulates

Simple past
fabulated

Past participle
fabulated

Present participle
fabulating

to Fabulate (third-person singular simple present Fabulates, present participle fabulating, simple past and past participle fabulated)
  1. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) (intransitive) To tell invented stories, often those that involve fantasy, such as fables.
    • 1990, Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka, Tractatus Brevus, Kluwer, page 38:
      Human fears, needs, dreams release the latent propensities of the subliminal soul, and to respond to them the fabulating imagination sets to work.
    • 1992, Donald C. Goellnicht, "Tang Ao in America: Male Subject Positions in China Men, Shirley Geok-lin Lim and Amy Ling (editors), Reading the Literatures of Asian America, Temple University Press, ISBN 978-0-87722-936-0, page 205:
      The objects remain those of male fantasies, but from the start Maxine associates the ability to fantasize or fabulate with women and with Cantonese: Patrono:...
    • 2006, Jérémie Valentin, “Gille Deleuze’s Political Posture”, chapter 12 of Constantin V. Boundas (editor), Deleuze and Philosophy, Edinburgh University Press, ISBN 978-0-7486-2480-5, page 196:
      It is only this posture that permits him to discharge his function as a chief: to fabulate and to summon up the missing people.
Derived termsModificar

Etymology 2Modificar

NounModificar

Singular
Fabulate

Plural
Fabulates

Fabulate (plural Fabulates)
  1. A folk story that is not entirely believable.
  2. (specifically) A folk story that is told for entertainment, and not intended to be taken as true.
See alsoModificar
Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.