See also Deaf

English[edit | edit source]

Etymology[edit | edit source]

Old English dēaf

Pronunciation[edit | edit source]

Adjective[edit | edit source]

Deaf (comparative er, superlative {{{2}}})

Positive
Deaf

Comparative
er

Superlative
{{{2}}}

  1. Not having the faculty of hearing, or only partially able to hear.

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Derived terms[edit | edit source]

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See also[edit | edit source]

Noun[edit | edit source]

the deaf singular collective noun

  1. Deaf people considered as a group.

Translations[edit | edit source]

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Old English[edit | edit source]

Pronunciation[edit | edit source]

Etymology[edit | edit source]

Common Germanic *daubhaz, from Indo-European *dheubh- (smoky, foggy, dim). Germanic cognates include Old Frisian dāf, Old Saxon dōf (Dutch doof), Old High German toub (German taub), Old Norse daufr (Swedish döv). The IE root is also the source of Greek τυφλός (blind).

Adjective[edit | edit source]

dēaf

  1. deaf

de:deaf et:deaf el:deaf fr:deaf ko:deaf hy:deaf io:deaf id:deaf it:deaf kn:deaf ka:deaf kk:deaf li:deaf hu:deaf ml:deaf my:deaf nl:deaf pl:deaf ru:deaf simple:deaf fi:deaf ta:deaf te:deaf tr:deaf vi:deaf zh:deaf

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