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See also bail out, and bail out on

EnglishModificar

Wikipedia
File:Bail (PSF).png

PronunciationModificar

Etymology 1Modificar

From the Old French verb bailler (to deliver or hand over) and noun bail (lease), from Latin bajulare (to carry or bear).

NounModificar

Singular
Bail

Plural
Bails

Bail (plural Bails)
  1. (law) Security, usually a sum of money, exchanged for the release of an arrested person as a guarantee of that person's appearance for trial.
  2. (law) Release from imprisonment on payment of such money.
  3. (law) The person providing such payment.
  4. Patrono:Cricket One of the two wooden crosspieces that rest on top of the stumps to form a wicket.
  5. A bucket or scoop used for removing water from a boat etc.
  6. (furniture) Normally curved handle suspended between sockets as a drawer pull.
Derived termsModificar
TranslationsModificar

VerbModificar

Infinitive
to Bail

Third person singular
Bails

Simple past
Bailed

Past participle
Bailed

Present participle
Bailing

to Bail (third-person singular simple present Bails, present participle Bailing, simple past and past participle Bailed)
  1. (law) To secure the release of an arrested person by providing bail.
  2. (law) To release a person under such guarantee.
  3. To set free.
  4. (law) To hand over personal property to be held temporarily by another as a bailment.
  5. Patrono:Nautical To remove water from a boat by scooping it out.
Derived termsModificar

(to hand over property to be held by another):

(to set free):

TranslationsModificar

Etymology 2Modificar

by shortening from bail out, which comes from etymology 1

VerbModificar

Infinitive
to Bail

Third person singular
Bails

Simple past
Bailed

Past participle
Bailed

Present participle
Bailing

to Bail (third-person singular simple present Bails, present participle Bailing, simple past and past participle Bailed)
  1. (slang) To exit quickly.
    With his engine in flames, the pilot had no choice but to bail out.
  2. (slang): To not attend.
    I'm going to bail on this afternoon's meeting.

Etymology 3Modificar

From Middle English beyl and Old Norse beygla, a bend, ring or hoop.

NounModificar

Singular
Bail

Plural
Bails

Bail (plural Bails)
  1. A hoop, ring or handle (especially of a kettle or bucket)
  2. A stall for a cow (or other animal) (usually tethered with a semi-circular hoop).
  3. A hinged bar as a restraint for animals, or on a typewriter.
  4. (mainly Australia & New Zealand) A frame to restrain a cow during outdoor milking.

VerbModificar

Infinitive
to Bail

Third person singular
Bails

Simple past
Bailed

Past participle
Bailed

Present participle
Bailing

to Bail (third-person singular simple present Bails, present participle Bailing, simple past and past participle Bailed)
  1. To secure the head of a cow during milking.
Usage notesModificar

Some of these senses, especially the hinged bar, are also claimed via Etymology 1

AnagramsModificar



IrishModificar

EtymologyModificar

From Patrono:Sga[[Category:ga:Patrono:Sga derivations|Bail]] [[bal#Patrono:Sga|bal]].

PronunciationModificar

  • IPA: /bˠalʲ/

NounModificar

Bail f.

  1. prosperity
  2. proper condition, order

DeclensionModificar

Patrono:Ga-noun-f2-nopl

ar:bail bg:bail et:bail el:bail fa:bail fr:bail gl:bail io:bail id:bail it:bail kn:bail ka:bail hu:bail ml:bail my:bail no:bail pl:bail ru:bail fi:bail sv:bail ta:bail th:bail vi:bail vo:bail zh:bail

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