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EnglishModificar

EtymologyModificar

amphibrach +‎ -ic. From Latin amphibrachicus

AdjectiveModificar

Amphibrachic (not comparable)

Positive
Amphibrachic

Comparative
not comparable

Superlative
none (absolute)

  1. Consisting of amphibrachs, metrical feet consisting of either a long syllable between two that are short, or an accented syllable between two that are not accented.
    • 1851, Goold Brown, The Grammar of English Grammars[1], 6th ed.:
      Father Humphrey says, "Anapaestic and amphibrachic verse, being similar in measure and movement, are pleasing to the ear, and well adapted to cheerful and humourous compositions; and sometimes to elegiac compositions, and subjects important and solemn."</span>
    • 1988 December 23, Albert Williams, “Melissa, While She Sleeps”, Chicago Reader:
      Patrono:...she will grow up to have long hair, a knack for the violin, an anonymous male admirer who writes her love poetry in amphibrachic tetrameter, and a son who dies in battlePatrono:....</span>
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