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English[]

Etymology 1[]

Pronunciation[]

Adjective[]

Agape (comparative {{{1}}}, superlative {{{2}}})

Positive
Agape

Comparative
{{{1}}}

Superlative
{{{2}}}

  1. Being in a state of astonishment, wonder, expectation, or eager attention; as with mouth hanging open.
    • 1923, Arthur Michael Samuel, “Roubiliac (1695-1762)”, in The Mancroft essays‎, page 159:
      There I stand, agape like any country bumpkin
    • 1980, Joel Flegler, Fanfare‎, vol. 3, page 198: 
      That's all well and good; one can sit, agape, reading the copious liner notes to this or any Explorer record, but it's what's inside the jacket that counts.
    • 1996, Lech J. Majewski, Julian Schnabel, Basquiat:
      The restaurant staff and OTHER DINNER GUESTS watch, agape.
  2. open wide.
    • 1995 Sep 24, “Stop Me If Yov've Heard this One”, Washington Post:
      In the last frame, he throws back his head and wails, his mouth agape.
    • 1996 August 2, “Johnson can fly, and he does it without wings”, Chicago Sun-Times:
      With dropped jaws and eyes agape, a world beholds the blur of Michael Johnson
    • 2004, Jeffrey C. Carrier, John A. Musick, & Michael R. Heithaus, Biology of Sharks and their Relatives‎, page 171
      If the slightly agape mouth is closed prior to mouth opening, this is termed the preparatory phase and is more common in suction-feeding bony fishes than elasmobranchs.
Usage notes[]
  • Almostly always used after a noun or noun phrase it modifies.
Synonyms[]
  • (being in a state of astonishment): dumbstruck, agog
  • (open wide): ajar, open, agog
Translations[]

Adverb[]

Agape (comparative {{{1}}}, superlative {{{2}}})

Positive
Agape

Comparative
{{{1}}}

Superlative
{{{2}}}

  1. In a state of astonishment, wonder, expectation, or eager attention.
    • 1987 Jun 26, “On the Prowl in Grizzly Country”, Chicago Tribune:
      Three of us--two biologists and I--were crouched behind a huge boulder at the water's edge and staring agape as the largest bear I ever saw came toward us
    • 2005 Sep 24, “Angry Surfers Say Cage-Diving Changes Great White's Way”, Wall Street Journal:
      "This is Sammy 91," he told the two dozen tourists watching agape."
    • 2008 Jan 8, “Reading gets the glitzy treatment”, BBC News:
      One features a science teacher looking agape at the camera which has caught him reading red-handed.
  2. open wide.
    • 1911 Jan 7, “The Man-killer”, Poverty Bay Herald:
      Its mouth yawned agape
    • 1996, Perri O'Shaughnessy, Invasion of Privacy‎, page 508
      The bathroom door stood agape, and the peeling vinyl floor was bare.
    • 2005, Terry Goodkind, Chainfire‎, page 427
      He glanced up into Richard's eyes, his own wide with wonder, his mouth hanging agape.
Translations[]

Etymology 2[]

From Ancient Greek ἀγάπη

Pronunciation[]

Noun[]

Singular
Agape

Plural
agapae

Agape (agapae)

  1. Template:Christianity the asexual love of God or Christ for mankind, or the asexual love of Christians for others.
  2. asexual, spiritual love.
  3. a love feast, especially one held in the early Christian Church in connection with the eucharist.
Translations[]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

References[]

  • 15px Agape on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • agape” in The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition, Houghton Mifflin Company, 2000.
  • agape” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.

Latin[]

Etymology[]

From Ancient Greek ἀγάπη (agapē), love; the love between man and God; Christian love feasts)

Noun[]

agapē (genitive agapēs); f, first declension

  1. Christian love or charity.
  2. The love feast of the early Christian Church; agape.

Inflection[]

Template:La-decl-1st-Greek

de:agape el:agape fr:agape io:agape no:agape pl:agape ru:agape sv:agape ta:agape te:agape vi:agape tr:agape

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