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EnglishModificar

EtymologyModificar

From Latin abrogātus, perfect passive participle of abrogō, formed from ab + rogō (ask, inquire, propose a law). See rogation.

PronunciationModificar

  • (UK) IPA: /ˈæbrəʊgeɪt/, /ˈæbrəgeɪt/
  • (US) IPA: /ˈæbrəgeɪt/

AdjectiveModificar

Abrogate (not comparable)

Positive
Abrogate

Comparative
not comparable

Superlative
none (absolute)

  1. (obsolete) Abrogated; abolished. - Hugh Latimer

VerbModificar

Infinitive
to Abrogate

Third person singular
Abrogates

Simple past
abrogated

Past participle
abrogated

Present participle
abrogating

to Abrogate (third-person singular simple present Abrogates, present participle abrogating, simple past and past participle abrogated)
  1. (transitive) To annul by an authoritative act; to abolish by the authority of the maker or her or his successor; to repeal; -- applied to the repeal of laws, decrees, ordinances, the abolition of customs, etc.
    • Let us see whether the New Testament abrogates what we so frequently see in the Old. - Robert South
    • Whose laws, like those of the Medes and Persian, they cannot alter or abrogate. - Edmund Burke
  2. (transitive) To put an end to; to do away with.

SynonymsModificar

Related termsModificar

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ItalianModificar

VerbModificar

abrogate

  1. Second-person plural present tense of abrogare.
  2. Second-person plural imperative of abrogare#Italian.
  3. Feminine plural of abrogato.ar:abrogate

fa:abrogate fr:abrogate io:abrogate it:abrogate hu:abrogate ml:abrogate my:abrogate pl:abrogate pt:abrogate ro:abrogate fi:abrogate ta:abrogate te:abrogate th:abrogate tr:abrogate uk:abrogate vi:abrogate

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